cup of coffee

Cold Brew Vs. Iced Coffee

     Heading into April, we begin drinking our classy ice beverages again and enjoying the delicious sun will sipping on some smooth iced coffee or tea. Check out our read below on Cold Brew Vs. Iced Coffee to get a fine understanding of what separates the two.     


Now if you are like me, and you crave the strength of any caffeinated beverage but prefer a lighter tone/roast you will find that your taste buds have meet their match, especially if you sip the delicious El Salvador roast (my personal favorite). But when it comes to "Cold Brew" vs. "Iced Coffee", what separates them? The answer is very simple yet overlooked quite commonly. And that answer is the brewing process. Cold brew's have a very unique and quite fitting brewing process that I believe all cold drinking should maintain as an equivalent of a regular drip brewing.

Source: http://www.foodandwine.com/fwx/drink/why-cold-brew-coffee-may-be-better-you-hot-coffee

     As I mentioned, the cold brew process is quite unique and fitting for it's temperature. Majority of cold brew's are done in a single, whole 5 pound batch and the process is a timely one and must be prepared the day before. The whole bean medium roast batch (or size of your liking and roast of your liking) is grinded and put back into the original bag. A whole 5 pound bag of coffee contains around 375 - 400 tablespoons of coffee, equivalent 1,500 fluid oz's or approximately 12 gallons of water. The brewing process we use is a 1 tablespoon to 4 fluid oz ratio, so we transfer all 5 pounds of grinded coffee to a 15 galloon container. You first insert a coffee net into the 15 gallon container, this net separates the liquid from the coffee grinds. After the net is securely wrapped in the container, the grounds are dumped in and you begin filling cold water to the brim. After so, put in the fridge 12 to 24 hours to begin the slow but soothingly delightful process of a cold brew. Patience is our biggest enemy here. Now, keep in mind when coffee beans are ground down they lose about 1/2 of their size so combining all these into a 15 gallon container does seem plausible, especially when the coffee grounds begin absorbing the water. Cold brews usually aim for a temperature around 32 to 40 degrees fahrenheit where the process is most effective, and is standard FDA recommended refrigeration temperature. After 24 hours has passed, pull out your heavy 15 gallon container, carefully remove the net to not let any of the grounds make contact with the liquid, and dump the beans (or for you planters, you could mix it in with the fertilizer, but that’s another discussion). Now, cold brews are concentrated out of the container, so you have to cut it! We usually cut it 50/50 or 40/60 with cold water. The Cold brew should last anywhere from 24-72 hours. After 72 hours we recommend dumping. And voila, poor in a glass cup with some cream, vanilla syrup over ice and you have a delicious cup of sweetened cold brew on a hot summer day.

Source: www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/30/iced-coffee-tips-hawaii_n_5531724

     Now, back to the standard and world renown champion Iced Coffee. A lot of businesses brew a hot cup container of coffee, and refrigerate it until the beverage is cold, and other businesses only brew a strong, extracted amount of coffee, cut with ice water, then that makes a iced coffee. Most consumers are satisfied with just this, but the biggest issue which is often avoided and overlooked in this process is dilution. A lot of companies cut their coffee, with hot brewed extract, then dump over ice, and then cut again with water. The issue is, when you put hot coffee over ice, you produce water so you will get a very watered down taste which doesn't really taste good, and believe me, you can taste the difference once you compare. Besides that, the general process and concept of Iced Coffee is quite simple, and is most commonly drank.

     Now, the choice is yours, choose the very elegant and concentrated Cold Brew, or the world champion and family favorite Iced Coffee.

Top 3 Coffee & Tea Equipment

Yimmies Coffee Tea Top 3

       

     Old coffee equipment is the bane of our existence. Every morning we use the same old coffee & tea brewer that has been tortured for the past 5 years, slugging along at that good old cup of Joe. But, what if I told you that, your good old cup of Joe, is actually a bad cup of Michael (Joe's great uncle). You'd be furious! How could your eyes have been deceived?! I must find Joe, and I need a good old cup of Joe!

All jokes aside, who doesn't love a freshly brewed cup of coffee or tea, that just starts your day off right. There are others ways that some might find their new favorite way of brewing their roast or leaves! Below, we rank our top 3 favorite home coffee equipment.


1. ChemEx

Source: https://www.stumptowncoffee.com/brew-guides/chemex

Source: https://www.stumptowncoffee.com/brew-guides/chemex

The ChemEx is commonly used for a pour over, or simply, a single-cup brew. The ChemEx is the most organic way to produce a hot cup of coffee and the process is simple. Take your coffee filter, put it on the top of the ChemEx, then simply scoop in your desired amount of coffee into the ChemEx. Next, you poor hot water over the coffee and wait for the coffee to drop into the ChemEx glass base. Most ChemEx equipment come with a wooden glass divider so that when the user is ready to drink the coffee, he/she may dispose of the filter & grinds and pour from the wooden grip, so that you do not burn themselves. Simple, clean and the closest you can get to a fully organic brew, ChemEx is a beautiful selection to add to your library of coffee and tea equipment.


2. Moka Pot

Source: www.homegrounds.co/best-coffee-for-moka-pots/

Source: www.homegrounds.co/best-coffee-for-moka-pots/

     The Moka Pot is our personal favorite. Such a beautiful and deep process that truly utilizes science. A Moka Pot is usually made of solid steel, with 3 separate pieces that make up the Moka Pot. First, is the base, or the, 'Bottom Chamber', where the reservoir of water is. Second, is the, 'Tube & Basket', or the, 'Funnel & Filter' as we like to call it. The tube & basket holds the coffee, tea or espresso, and is fitted into the bottom chamber. Combined, makes one whole piece. Water is poured into the bottom chamber, then the tube & basket is inserted into the water, then the grinds are poured into the basket. Next, is the 'Top Chamber', which contains a filter at the bottom. The filter's purpose is to prevent any grinds from entering the top chamber, where the beverage ends up.

Now that you understand the pieces, the process works at follows. Once the water is on the bottom chamber, the tube & basket is inserted into the bottom chamber, and the top chamber is screwed onto the bottom chamber, you simply put it over a stove around medium heat.

The brew is created when the heat vaporizes the water, and the heat causes the water to rise, through the tube into the basket, moistening the grinds in the basket. Once the heat continues to build up, the vapor shoots up the tube, into the basket, through the filter and onto the top chamber! Science! The process ends once no more vaporization appears, usually the bottom chamber is empty. The top chamber fits the same amount of liquid at the bottom chamber.


3. Samovar

Source: www.marigoldhouseware.com/kitchen/persian-samovars/mulex-germany-2-ltr-persian-samovar-electric-tea-machine.html

Source: www.marigoldhouseware.com/kitchen/persian-samovars/mulex-germany-2-ltr-persian-samovar-electric-tea-machine.html

     Ahh, the Samovar, or pronounced by some as, 'See-maw-ahr'. The ancient piece of beautiful equipment is commonly known throughout the Middle Eastern and European for it's fashionable ability to produce large amounts of tea or coffee (sorry espresso, you aren't welcomed here.) The Samovar is commonly used for larger parties as the quantity it produces is at large, and does not seem convenient for a single individual. As a matter of fact, Yimmies will be serving our tea in our Samovar that will be held within the store.

Samovar's where heated or brewed through coal & charcoal, but as convenience and technology meet the 2000's, the electric Samovar became the thing of the year. Some Samovar's have a built in tea bucket that holds large amounts of tea, others come directly with a removable tea kettle.

For built in tea baskets, water is heated through the middle chamber and once heated, it rises and filters through the tea basket and pours to the bottom of the chamber, which is connected to a spigot. There usually is a glass valve on the exterior that informs the user of the amount of tea left in the samovar.

For removeable tea kettles, the process is simple. The water is heated through the base, which can be accessed with a heat-proof spigot on the bottom of the container which dispenses hot water, then the individual can poor tea by handle of the tea kettle. Simple, clean, fast and can be used to serve amounts of people!

 

AND THAT'S IT! Our selection of Top 3 Coffee & Tea Equipment! Let us know what you think, send us a message on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram! Thanks for reading, stay tuned for the next blog and any big news that comes up. Coffee shop is opening soon.

Cold Brew Vs. Iced Coffee

     Now if you are like me, and you crave the strength of any caffeinated beverage but prefer a lighter tone/roast you will find that your taste buds have meet their match, especially if you sip the delicious El Salvador roast (my personal favorite). But when it comes to "Cold Brew" vs. "Iced Coffee", what separates them? The answer is very simple yet overlooked quite commonly. And that answer is the brewing process. Cold brew's have a very unique and quite fitting brewing process that I believe all cold drinking should maintain as an equivalent of a regular drip brewing.

Source: http://www.foodandwine.com/fwx/drink/why-cold-brew-coffee-may-be-better-you-hot-coffee

     As I mentioned, the cold brew process is quite unique and fitting for it's temperature. Majority of cold brew's are done in a single, whole 5 pound batch and the process is a timely one and must be prepared the day before. The whole bean medium roast batch (or size of your liking and roast of your liking) is grinded and put back into the original bag. A whole 5 pound bag of coffee contains around 375 - 400 tablespoons of coffee, equivalent 1,500 fluid oz's or approximately 12 gallons of water. The brewing process we use is a 1 tablespoon to 4 fluid oz ratio, so we transfer all 5 pounds of grinded coffee to a 15 galloon container. You first insert a coffee net into the 15 gallon container, this net separates the liquid from the coffee grinds. After the net is securely wrapped in the container, the grounds are dumped in and you begin filling cold water to the brim. After so, put in the fridge 12 to 24 hours to begin the slow but soothingly delightful process of a cold brew. Patience is our biggest enemy here. Now, keep in mind when coffee beans are ground down they lose about 1/2 of their size so combining all these into a 15 gallon container does seem plausible, especially when the coffee grounds begin absorbing the water. Cold brews usually aim for a temperature around 32 to 40 degrees fahrenheit where the process is most effective, and is standard FDA recommended refrigeration temperature. After 24 hours has passed, pull out your heavy 15 gallon container, carefully remove the net to not let any of the grounds make contact with the liquid, and dump the beans (or for you planters, you could mix it in with the fertilizer, but that’s another discussion). Now, cold brews are concentrated out of the container, so you have to cut it! We usually cut it 50/50 or 40/60 with cold water. The Cold brew should last anywhere from 24-72 hours. After 72 hours we recommend dumping. And voila, poor in a glass cup with some cream, vanilla syrup over ice and you have a delicious cup of sweetened cold brew on a hot summer day.

Source: www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/30/iced-coffee-tips-hawaii_n_5531724

     Now, back to the standard and world renown champion Iced Coffee. A lot of businesses brew a hot cup container of coffee, and refrigerate it until the beverage is cold, and other businesses only brew a strong, extracted amount of coffee, cut with ice water, then that makes a iced coffee. Most consumers are satisfied with just this, but the biggest issue which is often avoided and overlooked in this process is dilution. A lot of companies cut their coffee, with hot brewed extract, then dump over ice, and then cut again with water. The issue is, when you put hot coffee over ice, you produce water so you will get a very watered down taste which doesn't really taste good, and believe me, you can taste the difference once you compare. Besides that, the general process and concept of Iced Coffee is quite simple, and is most commonly drank.

     Now, the choice is yours, choose the very elegant and concentrated Cold Brew, or the world champion and family favorite Iced Coffee.