Roast

Cold Brew Vs. Iced Coffee

     Heading into April, we begin drinking our classy ice beverages again and enjoying the delicious sun will sipping on some smooth iced coffee or tea. Check out our read below on Cold Brew Vs. Iced Coffee to get a fine understanding of what separates the two.     


Now if you are like me, and you crave the strength of any caffeinated beverage but prefer a lighter tone/roast you will find that your taste buds have meet their match, especially if you sip the delicious El Salvador roast (my personal favorite). But when it comes to "Cold Brew" vs. "Iced Coffee", what separates them? The answer is very simple yet overlooked quite commonly. And that answer is the brewing process. Cold brew's have a very unique and quite fitting brewing process that I believe all cold drinking should maintain as an equivalent of a regular drip brewing.

Source: http://www.foodandwine.com/fwx/drink/why-cold-brew-coffee-may-be-better-you-hot-coffee

     As I mentioned, the cold brew process is quite unique and fitting for it's temperature. Majority of cold brew's are done in a single, whole 5 pound batch and the process is a timely one and must be prepared the day before. The whole bean medium roast batch (or size of your liking and roast of your liking) is grinded and put back into the original bag. A whole 5 pound bag of coffee contains around 375 - 400 tablespoons of coffee, equivalent 1,500 fluid oz's or approximately 12 gallons of water. The brewing process we use is a 1 tablespoon to 4 fluid oz ratio, so we transfer all 5 pounds of grinded coffee to a 15 galloon container. You first insert a coffee net into the 15 gallon container, this net separates the liquid from the coffee grinds. After the net is securely wrapped in the container, the grounds are dumped in and you begin filling cold water to the brim. After so, put in the fridge 12 to 24 hours to begin the slow but soothingly delightful process of a cold brew. Patience is our biggest enemy here. Now, keep in mind when coffee beans are ground down they lose about 1/2 of their size so combining all these into a 15 gallon container does seem plausible, especially when the coffee grounds begin absorbing the water. Cold brews usually aim for a temperature around 32 to 40 degrees fahrenheit where the process is most effective, and is standard FDA recommended refrigeration temperature. After 24 hours has passed, pull out your heavy 15 gallon container, carefully remove the net to not let any of the grounds make contact with the liquid, and dump the beans (or for you planters, you could mix it in with the fertilizer, but that’s another discussion). Now, cold brews are concentrated out of the container, so you have to cut it! We usually cut it 50/50 or 40/60 with cold water. The Cold brew should last anywhere from 24-72 hours. After 72 hours we recommend dumping. And voila, poor in a glass cup with some cream, vanilla syrup over ice and you have a delicious cup of sweetened cold brew on a hot summer day.

Source: www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/30/iced-coffee-tips-hawaii_n_5531724

     Now, back to the standard and world renown champion Iced Coffee. A lot of businesses brew a hot cup container of coffee, and refrigerate it until the beverage is cold, and other businesses only brew a strong, extracted amount of coffee, cut with ice water, then that makes a iced coffee. Most consumers are satisfied with just this, but the biggest issue which is often avoided and overlooked in this process is dilution. A lot of companies cut their coffee, with hot brewed extract, then dump over ice, and then cut again with water. The issue is, when you put hot coffee over ice, you produce water so you will get a very watered down taste which doesn't really taste good, and believe me, you can taste the difference once you compare. Besides that, the general process and concept of Iced Coffee is quite simple, and is most commonly drank.

     Now, the choice is yours, choose the very elegant and concentrated Cold Brew, or the world champion and family favorite Iced Coffee.

Yimmies' Top 5 Favorite Drinks

What would you rather choose, a classic cup of coffee, or a stick that tastes like a banana? Of course in this scenario a classic cup of coffee is, a cup of coffee and the stick that tastes like a banana is a Starbucks Pumpkin Spice Latte, which actually contains no pumpkin, doesn't make sense, right?...

*Mic Drop*

Here at Yimmies, we love to promote clean and authentic coffee. Gone are the days of non-filtered syrups, false advertising and 1,020 calories of Jamocha Pop Pepperment Mocha Whipped Frappumamajama lattes. We love the classics. Of course, nothing is wrong with a sugar craving here and there, by all means, knock yourself out.

You probably are asking by now, "So, beautiful, masculine and smart Yimmies editorial person, what do you prefer to drink?" And we knew you'd totally ask that! So we went ahead and ranked our top 5 favorite caffeinated beverages, with all the whipped cream and sprinkles included.


1. Latte

The latte, very classic, very traditional. The classy drink that never goes out of style, is a blend of perfectly pulled espresso, and the smoothest milk you can find. Always number 1 on our list. Of course, we also recommend ceramic.

Source: baristaexchange.com/photo/latte-art-837?context=latest

Source: baristaexchange.com/photo/latte-art-837?context=latest


2. French Praline Latte

Hazelnut, Vanilla, Brown sugar and Pecans, how delicious does that sound? Combined with some espresso which compliments well with hazelnut and pecan, they pair perfectly. Definitely a Yimmies special, we plan on selling in our coffee house. Not too sweet, not too bitter, perfect for the sweet tooth.

Source: cafepalazzo.com.au/product/200g-flavoured-coffees/french-vanilla-coffee-6x200g-pack

Source: cafepalazzo.com.au/product/200g-flavoured-coffees/french-vanilla-coffee-6x200g-pack


3. Cafe Au Lait

French, which literally translates to, "Coffee with Milk". Now, this isn't your typical coffee with half and half, definitely not. Cafe Au Lait is a beverage with half of it being rich skim or whole milk and the other half being coffee. This hot or cold drink leaves huge room for creativity, as you can make, for example, Horchata Cafe Au Lait, replacing the milk with Horchata which sounds delicious now that you think about it. Actually... we think we'll go make one now, be right back.

Source: pinterest.com/pin/193725221444461298

Source: pinterest.com/pin/193725221444461298


4. Caramel Cafe Americano

Translates from Italian to, "Coffee with Water". Americano is a delicacy, not for the light hearted. This caffeine packed beverage simply provides a +1 shot of espresso than the usual size, with a combination of hot water. Over the years of our coffee crafting experience, we have constantly indulged ourselves for this drink, but who knew caramel would work wonderfully with this beverage. Doubling as a creamer and a sweetener, a Caramel Cafe Americano is the perfect beverage for a hot day, or the cold winters as it can be done both iced and hot. We prefer the Caramel Cafe Americano iced.

Source: fiveelementscafe.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Americano

Source: fiveelementscafe.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Americano


5. Cappuccino

Ahh, the classic and original Cappuccino. The sister of the Latte, the beautiful and voluptuous foam complements the espresso with the up-most delight. This benchmark barista training beverage has coffee written all over it, and is the classic treat of hand crafted beverages. This drink leaves huge room for creativity often calling for art with syrup, foam stamps and 3D Art. Cappuccino's are definitely on our top 5 list for the luxury it provides in taste, thickness of milk, foam and espresso that just works oh so well with each other, and complements greatly with any flavored syrup. Enjoy.

Source: pinterest.com/pin/101260691594557338/

Source: pinterest.com/pin/101260691594557338/

That's about it, for now. Of course, we love all beverages, but these are on our top 5 beverages that we love the most! If you think there is a beverage that should of made it on the list, tell us why! Oh, and we have some honorable mentions below!

Honorable Mentions:

- Espresso

- Toffee Nut Latte

- Caramel Cold Brew

- Sarah White (Yimmies Exclusive)

- Cold Toe

 

Cold Brew Vs. Iced Coffee

     Now if you are like me, and you crave the strength of any caffeinated beverage but prefer a lighter tone/roast you will find that your taste buds have meet their match, especially if you sip the delicious El Salvador roast (my personal favorite). But when it comes to "Cold Brew" vs. "Iced Coffee", what separates them? The answer is very simple yet overlooked quite commonly. And that answer is the brewing process. Cold brew's have a very unique and quite fitting brewing process that I believe all cold drinking should maintain as an equivalent of a regular drip brewing.

Source: http://www.foodandwine.com/fwx/drink/why-cold-brew-coffee-may-be-better-you-hot-coffee

     As I mentioned, the cold brew process is quite unique and fitting for it's temperature. Majority of cold brew's are done in a single, whole 5 pound batch and the process is a timely one and must be prepared the day before. The whole bean medium roast batch (or size of your liking and roast of your liking) is grinded and put back into the original bag. A whole 5 pound bag of coffee contains around 375 - 400 tablespoons of coffee, equivalent 1,500 fluid oz's or approximately 12 gallons of water. The brewing process we use is a 1 tablespoon to 4 fluid oz ratio, so we transfer all 5 pounds of grinded coffee to a 15 galloon container. You first insert a coffee net into the 15 gallon container, this net separates the liquid from the coffee grinds. After the net is securely wrapped in the container, the grounds are dumped in and you begin filling cold water to the brim. After so, put in the fridge 12 to 24 hours to begin the slow but soothingly delightful process of a cold brew. Patience is our biggest enemy here. Now, keep in mind when coffee beans are ground down they lose about 1/2 of their size so combining all these into a 15 gallon container does seem plausible, especially when the coffee grounds begin absorbing the water. Cold brews usually aim for a temperature around 32 to 40 degrees fahrenheit where the process is most effective, and is standard FDA recommended refrigeration temperature. After 24 hours has passed, pull out your heavy 15 gallon container, carefully remove the net to not let any of the grounds make contact with the liquid, and dump the beans (or for you planters, you could mix it in with the fertilizer, but that’s another discussion). Now, cold brews are concentrated out of the container, so you have to cut it! We usually cut it 50/50 or 40/60 with cold water. The Cold brew should last anywhere from 24-72 hours. After 72 hours we recommend dumping. And voila, poor in a glass cup with some cream, vanilla syrup over ice and you have a delicious cup of sweetened cold brew on a hot summer day.

Source: www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/30/iced-coffee-tips-hawaii_n_5531724

     Now, back to the standard and world renown champion Iced Coffee. A lot of businesses brew a hot cup container of coffee, and refrigerate it until the beverage is cold, and other businesses only brew a strong, extracted amount of coffee, cut with ice water, then that makes a iced coffee. Most consumers are satisfied with just this, but the biggest issue which is often avoided and overlooked in this process is dilution. A lot of companies cut their coffee, with hot brewed extract, then dump over ice, and then cut again with water. The issue is, when you put hot coffee over ice, you produce water so you will get a very watered down taste which doesn't really taste good, and believe me, you can taste the difference once you compare. Besides that, the general process and concept of Iced Coffee is quite simple, and is most commonly drank.

     Now, the choice is yours, choose the very elegant and concentrated Cold Brew, or the world champion and family favorite Iced Coffee.